Morcellator Spread Cancerous Tissue Lawsuit

Attorneys representing Norfolk, Newport News, Roanoke & nearby areas of Virginia

Uterine fibroids are no joke. They could potentially have cancer inside of them. But if you had them removed with a device called a morcellator, you may have had more harm done than good. These devices may actually spread cancerous tissue around.

In July 2014, the Wall Street Journal reported that Johnson & Johnson decided to withdraw the morcellator from the market, urging customers to return the device. Though it defended the safety of the tool, it had stopped sales of new morcellators in April 2014 amidst debate, stating it was waiting for more information from the medical community.

According to the Wall Street Journal, as of March 2016, about 100 cases against Johnson & Johnson, the previous leader in selling morcellator devices, have been filed. Settlements range from $100,000 to $1 million, depending on injuries incurred and circumstances.

What is a Morcellator?

A morcellator is a surgical tool used during laparoscopic (minimally invasive) surgery. The morcellator helps surgeons divide and remove large tissue masses, especially when performing laparoscopic hysterectomies. It is also used to remove uterine fibroids, which have a chance of being cancerous.

Morcellators allow surgeons to use small incisions and hasten recovery time, but it's now thought that morcellators may leave cancerous tissue behind or even spread it through the surgical site.

Uterine Fibroids & Need for Surgery

According to the United State's Office on Women's Health, fibroids (also called "myoma") are muscular tumors that grow on the uterine wall. Generally benign, fibroids can be single or multiple in number; the size of the tumor varies.

Symptoms include heaving bleeding, frequent urination, lower back pain, or fullness in the pelvic area. As a result, many women desire or have a medical need to get these fibroids removed.

While the tool is not banned, the FDA strongly recommends against using the morcellator for surgical procedures. However, some doctors prefer to use these devices because traditional surgery to remove uterine fibroids is much more invasive. Until more study can be done, the risks of spreading cancer through the body is too great.

If you had surgery involving a morcellator and then discovered new cancer where the surgery was, we urge you to contact Kalfus & Nachman. You may be able to obtain substantial compensation that can be used to pay your new medical bills. For more information or for a free consultation, call us at 800-361-0430. Our firm serves the State of Virginia.